Member New Book Alert: Murder Knows No Season by Cathy Ace

When we hear that one of our members has a new book coming out, we know we’re in store for a treat. Sometimes we don’t hear about it until after the fact, which always makes us feel like we should have known sooner. (Moral of the story: if you have a book coming, please let us know well in advance. It’s our pleasure to add an item right here on our web site to help spread the word.)

Of course, a new book by Cathy Ace is such a treat, it almost doesn’t need introduction. Yet we’re glad to know about Murder Knows No Season, which is available now.

Murder Knows No Season is a terrific introduction to the world of mystery by Cathy Ace.

The book is comprised of four very different novellas, one for each season.

WINTER: The Corpse with Eight Faces: A Cait Morgan Mystery
Trapped in a snowbound lodge in the Canadian countryside, Cait is faced with a corpse, and a group of eight suspects. A classic closed-circle mystery featuring Cait Morgan, before she and Bud Anderson knew each other well enough for her to be able to call upon him for help.

SPRING: The Case of the Desperate Duchess: A WISE Enquiries Agency Mystery
Christine Wilson-Smythe’s cousin, Lady Jacintha Wraysbury, calls in the WISE Enquiries Agency to hunt for a missing girl: her assistant at her flower shop. In this early case for the agency, readers join the private investigators as they scour West London for a girl who’s in more danger than any of them imagine.

SUMMER: A standalone thriller Out and About in a Boat  
Meet the Golightlys, an average Canadian family. When dad Dave wants to take his fifteen year-old son Zack and thirteen year-old daughter Becky for a weekend at a local lake, mum Debbie is hesitant. After all, she and Dave are separated for good reason. But what could go wrong in just thirty hours? When there’s a dead body involved, quite a lot.

AUTUMN: The Fall: A DI Evan Glover Case
Not all Welshmen are rugby fans, only the ones who breathe. DI Evan Glover has played and loved the game since he was a boy, so when the body of one of Wales’ most celebrated rugby players — GGR Davies — is found at the bottom of a cliff, the question “Did he jump, or was he pushed?” is one of national significance. As he digs into what might have led to the tragedy, Glover discovers his hero might not have been the man he — and all of Wales — thought he was.

You can read more about Cathy on her web site here.

SinC Canada West interview: Cathy Ace

Cathy Ace was born and raised in Swansea, South Wales and Cathy is, like her heroine Cait Morgan, now a Canadian citizen. “Cait’s Welsh Canadian, as am I. They say ‘write what you know’, so a short, plus-sized Welsh woman, who’s quite bossy, fits the bill! But Cait and I are not one and the same: she’s got skills and talents I don’t possess, and I’m delighted to say that I don’t usually encounter corpses wherever I go. I’ve burrowed even deeper

into my roots by creating a cast of characters in the WISE women who come from all four corners of the United Kingdom, and work in a uniquely British setting – a ducal estate set in the rolling Welsh countryside of the Wye Valley in Powys, where I spent a good deal of time when I was young.”

Cathy’s short stories have appeared in multiple anthologies. Two of her works, “Dear George” and “Domestic Violence”, have also been produced by Jarvis & Ayres Productions as “Afternoon Reading” broadcasts for BBC Radio 4.

Cathy won the 2015 Bony Blithe Award for Best Canadian Light Mystery (for THE CORPSE WITH THE PLATINUM HAIR) and was shortlisted again in 2017 (for THE CORPSE WITH THE GARNET FACE). “Steve’s Story”, which appears in The Whole She Bang 3, published by Sisters in Crime Toronto, was shortlisted for Best Short Story in the 2017 Arthur Ellis Awards for Excellence in Canadian Crime Writing.

 

Sin-CW: What was the inspiration for both your series, the Cait Morgan Mysteries and the WISE Enquiries Agency Mysteries?

Cathy Ace: I think that, like many writers, I initially created a character close to my heart – and to myself, personally. Cait Morgan is a short, overweight, bossy Welshwoman, who is a professor of criminal psychology at a university in Vancouver.

When I wrote the first two books I was still lecturing at Simon Fraser University in marketing and marketing communications, not criminology. I was able to audit the entire criminology syllabus when I was there, which was fantastic! I’m not Cait, and she’s not me, but there are definite similarities. I have spent my life traveling a great deal, and have been fortunate to live and work in some wonderful places around the world. I took Cait on journeys to many of those places – places where I was able to write with real knowledge about the locale, history, architecture, art, people, food and drink… the critical factors that mold and express culture.

For the WISE Enquiries Agency mysteries, I wanted to use a setting that allowed me to spend more time “back in my homeland” of Wales. I migrated to Canada in 2000 and, although I still visit my family in Wales frequently, I wanted to “spend more time there,” which the books allow me to do. I also wanted to use multiple points of view and voices – rather than the first person I’d been using for Cait.

What is it about those locales that made you want to set your series there?

Personally, I’m not keen on the process of travel – especially these days. But I very much enjoy “being” somewhere “else.” Having traveled for decades both on business and because I am an inquisitive person, I have developed a fascination for how outsiders see places versus how those places are made and experienced by those who have always lived there. The world has so much to offer, but I’m only too well aware that, for many, visiting other countries is not possible. So I do my best to bring the places I love to those who can enjoy them in their armchairs, reading nooks, or in bed before they turn out the light. Each Cait Morgan book takes place in a different country, and each mystery really could only happen exactly where it’s set, as I like to weave the locale into the work so thoroughly that it becomes a character in its own right. There are still many places I would enjoy taking my readers.

Please tell us about your writing workspace.

I’m sitting at the dining table – because my writing room is in such a mess! A “big sort out” stalled, and I can’t face the piles of paper in what needs to be a mentally quiet place, so I’m now ignoring it and have moved my laptop to the dining table – which gives me a great view out, which is rather distracting!

Do you remember what sparked the idea for any of your stories? Tell us about one.

I can’t say too much, because it would result in a great big spoiler, but The Corpse with the Silver Tongue grew out of a moment of inspiration that struck when I was listening to a program on BBC Radio 4 about snail farmers in Scotland. Until that moment I’d been happy to eat escargots without thinking about the fact that snails might actually be farmed, as opposed to… I don’t know… picked at random from the fields? I learned a lot listening to that program… and put it all to nefarious use.

Do you belong to any writer’s groups or communities? Do you think these types of social interactions are important for writers?

Writing is, at its heart, a solitary process, and existence. I, personally, am also someone who tends to stand outside, looking in. That said, when my first novel was published I realized I knew nothing about the world of crime writing, or crime publishing… I knew a great deal about crime reading, as that was my reading genre of choice, so I joined Crime Writers of Canada (CWC) in 2012. In 2013 I became regional representative for BC, in 2014 I became National Vice President (a title changed to Vice Chair in 2015 when Canadian bylaws shifted) and then was Chair from 2016-2018. I’ll be “Past Chair” until the current Chair (Mike Martin) steps down. As you can imagine, therefore, CWC has taken up most of my time and energy for the past six years. Now that I am able to take a backseat, I’ll make sure my memberships of Sisters in Crime, International Thriller Writers, Crime Writers Association (UK), Mystery Writers of America and Crime Cymru are all areas I’ll grow into. I find the aforementioned bodies useful because I can dip into all of them for insights (pertaining to different markets, audiences, and specific subgenres) but I’m promising myself to keep my membership online, because that’s where I find the “socializing” to be most useful.

Do you remember the first story you wrote? Tell us about it.

The first short story I wrote was called “Dear George.” I was waiting at an airport for my sister, whose flight was delayed… I bought a magazine that had a short story-writing competition in it… I entered. As a result, “Dear George” was published in the 1980s in an anthology with works by “real authors,” and I was chuffed to bits! I had also just set up my own business, so I wasn’t about to give that up just because of one short story. The story was anthologized again in a book called Thrillers which was a set book on the GSCE English Language syllabus in the UK (the exam all 16 year-olds sit), which was fantastic, and was then produced for BBC Radio 4 in 2007. It was this which spurred me to begin to write fiction again – which I did in 2007, self-publishing a collection of short stories, then a collection of novellas in 2008. I have recently re-written and re-edited that original collection (though I think I’m correct in saying that I changed maybe only two sentences in “Dear George”) and the collection Murder Keeps No Calendar contains many of them, plus some newer pieces.

Are you a planner/outliner/architect or a pantser/gardener/discovery writer?

I’m most definitely a planner. I know some authors say they sit down and just let the story flow from their fingertips, and I think I envy them… but it wouldn’t work for me.

For me? I think through the entire story until I can run it in my head like a movie, from beginning to end. Then I do the outlines of the “acts,” then the “scenes.” For each scene I know where it takes place, who’s there, the role they’ll play, and what has to happen by the end. I lay all this out within an Excel spreadsheet, then add a column for what I hope the reader will feel (rather than know) at the end of that scene. When it comes to writing the first draft I work from that outline. If it needs to change, I change it, but it usually stays pretty much as I had planned it.

Do you think there were early influences as a reader that have guided the stories you create as a writer? What were they?

I grew up (as did so many I know) reading Nancy Drew books, plus a wide range of works by Enid Blyton and Agatha Christie. Throw in Ngaio Marsh and Ellery Queen and you’ve got the background to most of my early reading, which all absolutely influenced my writing. Traditional crime is the core of my work – it’s where I am happy to read, and write.

You’ve recently moved into the independent publishing world from traditional publishing. What has that been like?

I would characterize today’s world of independent publishing as a place where you can do whatever you like… as long as you learn the rules of the game first. There’s a huge learning curve just in terms of formatting, etc., but what you also need to understand is how people want to read your work. I ended up publishing in mobi for Kindle and via Createspace for print via Amazon, but also through Ingram Spark for print to be available through bookstores and libraries, as well as epub for Kobo and Nook. All need slightly different formatting, all need you to jump through the hoops in terms of setting up accounts, getting to know their systems. But it seems to be working (I think!).

Do you prefer music, silence, or some other noise in the background when you write? If music, what kind?

I’m an absolute silence kinda gal! Of course there’s no such thing, but I’m lucky enough to live halfway up a little mountain where we have no through traffic, so I can usually hear the birds singing rather than the thrum of traffic, which suits me down to the ground. I can work if there’s “white noise” like news TV in the background, but just can’t cope if I can half hear a bass beat in the distance, for example.

Tell us about your other works, projects, publications, and what’s on the horizon next. 

As I write this I’m awaiting feedback from my editor and beta readers on “something new.” In my recent collection Murder Keeps No Calendar, readers were able to be on the spot when Cait Morgan first met Bud Anderson, and when the women of the WISE Enquiries Agency decided to work together… they also met DI Evan Glover of the West Glamorgan Police Service.

In my new book, The Wrong Boy, Evan is two days from retirement, and encounters the most baffling case of his career. This is closer to being a domestic thriller, with a thread of non-procedural police intervention than it is to “traditional” crime. As for what I’ll do with it… oh my goodness me, I wish I could tell you. Suffice to say, I am talking to all sorts of people about all sorts of possibilities at the moment. I fired my agent last year, and walked away from a contract with an existing publisher – so I am free and clear and… having to decide exactly what to do, and how, next. Having dreamed of being published by a traditional publisher, and of finding an agent, I am now peculiarly unafraid of being without either. I don’t know why I’m not scared, I’m just not. I’m happy with where I am at the moment, and looking forward to whatever the next chapter brings – though, unfortunately, I know I can’t write it like I would a scene in a book and have it turn out exactly as I might wish. One thing I do know for certain is that a re-written and re-edited collection of four novellas, Murder Knows No Season, will be out before the end of 2018; I have my editor booked, and have to work on the manuscript quite soon. Then… who knows? Watch this space!

To find out about the works I’ve already had published, please check out my website: http://www.cathyace.com/

To be up to date with all my news, follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ace-Author-318388861616661/  and on Twitter, you can find me here: @AceCathy

 

 

 

TWO Free Events in August

We’re nothing less than entirely chuffed at the response to our 2018 Summer Writers Retreat: it’s now sold out!
But never fear: we’re keeping a waiting list. If you’d like a chance to snag a seat that may come available (Life happens, right?), contact Retreat Committee Chair Sandra Wong to put your name on the list.
In the meantime, if you’ll be in the Victoria area on August 17 and/or 18, mark your calendar for these two free events, held in conjunction with the retreat:
SINC-CW Retreat Meet & Greet
FRI AUG 17   7PM start
Swan’s Pub (506 Pandora Ave.)
SinC—Canada West has reserved space at Swan’s Pub for a casual, “no-host” social. Join us and meet retreat attendees; make new friends who have writerly interests in common; and enjoy an evening of book talk and lively spirits.
Crime Fiction Panel Discussion
SAT AUG 18    7PM to 9PM
Bolen Books (#111 – 1644 Hillside Ave.)
Victoria’s famed Bolen Books is hosting New York Times-bestselling author Laurie R. King on a panel alongside Canada West author-members, Marcelle Dubé, Liz Freeland, and Janice MacDonald. Moderated by chapter Past President S.G. Wong, “Author Alchemy: Spinning Facts into Fiction Gold” is sure to be an engaging look into how authors turn reams of research into compelling narratives. Join us for learning, laughter, and some great crime fiction writers!

Guest Post by S.G. Wong

Sometimes, I’m tempted to envy writer-me.

Writer-me doesn’t worry about social media platforms or search engine optimization or A/B testing. Writer-me doesn’t worry about Amazon algorithms or Facebook ad buys or email subscribers. Writer-me just worries about plot lines and character motivations and conflict in every scene and hitting those keys one after another, hoping and praying the frenzied images and thoughts in her mind translate even fractionally into something coherent that will entertain and engage complete strangers who will fork over their hard-earned money in order to spend a few hours of their busy lives with the twisted creations of her imagination…

On second thought, writer-me has plenty of worries.

Which is probably a good reason for writer-me to give up the reins to author-me when it comes to marketing.

Whether or not you’re published right now, if you hope/plan to publish your books or publish more books, author-you is a great asset. This is the part of your brain that takes writer-you’s work and makes sure it finds its readers. I like to think of writer-us as inward-focussed—the part of us driven to spin stories from what amounts to nothing more than firing neurons. That means that author-us has to take care of focussing outward, on our readers and how to entice them to commit time and money to our books.

Sounds simple, doesn’t it?

I think it can be, once we build a proper framework for approaching marketing. Like a musician’s instruction to ‘return to note,’ if author-us lays the groundwork, we’ll always have a place to start when considering where next to aim our marketing efforts. And the best part is that we have the power to make it simple—simple and fun.

 

S.G. Wong is the Arthur Ellis Awards finalist, Whistler Independent Book Awards nominee, and indie author  who writes the Lola Starke series and Crescent City short stories: hard-boiled detective tales set in an alternate-history 1930s-era “Chinese L.A.” replete with ghosts and magic. As an acclaimed moderator and creator, she presents on panels and workshops in venues ranging from ChiSeries Winnipeg to Bouchercon 2017 to Ignite Change Global Gathering for Human Rights. She is based in Edmonton, Alberta, where she can often be found staring out the window in between frenzied bouts of typing.

Guest Post: Skin in the Game by Janice MacDonald

Mystery fiction, with all the requirements and conventions of the genre, leaves quite a bit of room open to writers to examine the social and political overtones of a time or place. Many otherwise marginalized people or ideas find their way into detective fiction long before they reach the pages of mainstream novels. Perhaps, because the mechanics of the genre are so fixed in terms of plot (murder, puzzle, sleuth, clues, suspects, villain, solution), mystery writers use the descriptive details of the world or time around the plot to really make their individual mark. When creating a fictional world, even if it’s a fictional overlay of a very real world – like the Edmonton of my amateur sleuth Randy Craig – the dedication to detail is both what makes it come alive for readers and what makes the task of writing it the most satisfying.

Of course, when I say detail, I am not talking about overloading your manuscript with page after page of description, listing every book on a suspect’s bookshelf, or every dessert on the restaurant’s menu, offering every historical fact you have unearthed in your research. Unless you are creating a character with a troubling level of awareness of the world around them, too much detail can actually dull the reader’s senses to the world they are being shown. The trick is to know which detail to linger on, which flower to paint in lovingly while smudging the rest in as only a swirl of colour.

When it comes to populating your fictional world, the same holds true. As your character walks down the street, not everyone catches her eye, and gender or ethnicity is not always what she reflects on. However, if her attention does snag on something, this is a writer’s perfect opportunity to dive into enough detail to bring the scene to life and add to your character’s complexity or backstory.

Do the pasty white arms of the fellow drumming outside the concert venue match the plastic buckets that he’s wailing on, leading her to wonder if he only comes out at night, and lives underground during the day, perhaps close to the subway, where the thrumbling of the train would soothe his rhythmic soul? That might be a useful way to provide a sense of what sort of person busks for change on the streets of your fictional city while showing the capacity for your protagonist to extrapolate and imagine.

On the other hand, if you are describing a panhandler or dissolute person, is there any reason to note their ethnicity? Surely how they are dressed, what they say, or whether they look you in the eye with the rolling gaze of a skittish racehorse when they speak to you are all far more interesting aspects for sketching in their character. Leaving racial traits blank in this case can open the door of possibility to your reader that they themselves may be only one or two paycheques from this character themselves.

If your protagonist needs to visit a banker, or a lawyer, or some other person in a position of power or authority, why not make them female? Why not make them people of colour? Why not make them openly gay? All of these characters showed up as the main characters in detective fiction long before they populated mainstream novels. Without being heavy-handed about it, you can find all sorts of places to work against stereotype and move your world forward to a more egalitarian playing field. The great usefulness of literature is to show people what is possible. Without example, no one realizes they too can be part of the picture. It took a book set in Edmonton to let me even dream that I too could really become a writer.

Part of our job as writers is to present a recognizable world to our readers, one they can believe in so that they can easily suspend disbelief and enjoy the story we are spinning. Another part of our job is to show them a world of possibilities – to present them with distinct people in clearly defined worlds who could be mingling and connecting and supporting each other in a civilized and temperate society. Except, of course, for that pesky murderer.

 

Janice MacDonald is the creator of the Randy Craig Mysteries, the first detective series set in Edmonton, Alberta. Her reluctant heroine was born as Janice was working on her MA thesis titled “Parody and Detective Fiction.” Janice’s career has been one of writing and reading – and lecturing about both. She has been a book reviewer, university lecturer, radio interviewer and editor, as well as writing 12 books, numerous short stories and articles, several plays and the songs for two musicals.

 

Guest Post by Linda L. Richards

When I am asked to attend writers festivals, one of the things I love doing are the blue pencil editing sessions. I’ve been doing this all long enough and from such different angles, that sometimes sitting there, across from a new writer, I feel like a fortune teller. A few pages of any manuscript and I am forming opinions: on how to make it better. On how to mold it. On how to sell it. On who to sell it to.

And so, in this fortune teller mode, I opine and have watched while fledgling authors look at me with their jaws shaped into an “O” that looks something like amazement. It’s a fun feeling, being able to share my accumulated knowledge, but it’s not amazing. I’ve just been driving this highway a lot and for a really long time and I care about it all a great deal.

My first book was published in 1994. It was non-fiction, and I had been a journalist and sometimes an editor for many years before that. By now, I am the author or co-author of 15 books. I have professionally edited for individuals and for publishing houses. I have been the publisher and editor-in-chief of a respected book publishing house. I have taught writing and publishing at the college level, as well as others. I have been the editor of an online magazine about books almost (it feels) since the dawn of the Internet. I am passionate about books, how they are created, made and marketed and, on this highway, I’ve learned a thing or two. I have a lot of information to share. I know that in the allotted hour at the Sisters in Crime Summer Retreat, we won’t have time to cover even the beginning of everything, but we’ll take a run at it together. Bring your questions.

 

Linda L. Richards is the award-winning author of 15 books, a highly sought after professional editor, and the former Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Self-Counsel Press. She has also taught writing and publishing at the college level.

 

On “Siblings” & Community

Sisters in Crime was originally created in 1987 as a safe and supportive community for women crime writers, when such women’s works were rarely seen face-out on mystery bookshelves, let alone on bestsellers and awards lists. Fast forward 30 years and many wonderful changes have happened in the publishing industry—while many issues have also remained stubbornly unresolved.

One thing SinC has always stood for is inclusion. That’s often a lot easier said than done for Canada West, a chapter that spans four western provinces and two northern territories. While online technologies are integral to connecting members, the sheer vastness of our chapter’s territory makes in-person meetings a definite challenge.

So it’s easy to imagine the excitement of the chapter Executive when the idea of a live retreat first came up. Though the planning committee volunteers were naturally star-struck at the possibility of meeting and learning from Laurie R. King, an incredibly successful SinC sibling (multiple New York Times bestseller, anyone?), they were just as jazzed about the potential of creating a true community builder.

The Summer Writers Retreat is about supporting and encouraging writers of all genres and experience with a day of professional development and opportunities for new friendships and career connections. (Sprinkling in a few fun events can’t hurt, either.) The retreat is meant to give like-minded people a place to “geek out” on writing craft topics and industry tips and then, to take home things to try within a cloud of happy feelings of camaraderie and community.

The publishing industry has certainly changed since 1987, but our commitment to inclusion and uplifting one another remains as strong as ever.

Guest post by Laurie R. King

When I sat down in 1987 and wrote the opening line of The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, what did I—an at-home, 35 year-old mother of young children—imagine would happen?

I was fifteen when I first met Sherlock Holmes, fifteen years old with my nose in a book as I walked the Sussex Downs, and nearly stepped on him.

Did I have the faintest glimmer of an imagination that, three decades later, I would be thinking about my sixteenth novel in the series? Would my wildest dreams have known that most of those would be New York Times bestsellers? Or that people—readers, other writers—might regard me as any kind of an expert on…well, anything, really?

Nope. At the time I sat down and wrote those words, I knew nothing about the early 20th century, or about southern England. I knew less than nothing about Sherlock Holmes. At the time, I wanted to tell a coming-of-age story about a young woman with a mind like that of The Great Detective.

But once your character has come of age—which happens for Mary Russell in the second book, when she turns 21 and has to decide which path her life will follow—then what?

A series is faced with that same decision. Do I write characters who are fixed, in personality if not in time, and give them adventures that can be read in any order? Or do I let each episode shape those characters, giving the series an overall narrative arc?

When I began the Russell “memoirs” (they’re written in first person) I was not terribly interested in Sherlock Holmes. As a supporting actor, as the pattern on which Russell’s mind was formed, Holmes was both fun and useful—if nothing else, contrasting a middle-aged Victorian male to a young 20th century feminist offered me a near endless source of conflict and snappy dialogue.

But one of the intriguing things about the Conan Doyle detective is how somehow, despite his façade of being a cold and unresponsive thinking machine, we feel that Holmes is driven by very human impulses—a passion for justice, a deep need to set things right. As John D. MacDonald put it (in the 1984 edition of Mystery Writing Handbook):

We remember Holmes as a man who, primarily, was troubled in spirit, was obsessed with the sense of evil, whose arrogance was defensive.

In other words: anything but coldly inhuman.

The awareness of that side of the man gradually permeated my own version of him, and made possible a series of 16 books that still interest their writer (and, one gathers, their readers). Around the fourth or fifth book, I started to become interested in Holmes as a character, rather than as a foil for Mary Russell. How would the devastation of the Great War have affected him, I wondered? What about the man in 1915, as opposed to 1880, opened him up to taking an apprentice—and a female one at that? And how would that apprentice-turned-partner have challenged him, as clearly Dr. Watson had not?

How would both of these extraordinary characters have changed, over time?

And with that, the Russell & Holmes series developed a narrative arc, about something larger than the adventures of two phenomenal minds.

 

Laurie R. King is the New York Times bestselling author of 27 novels and other works, including the Mary Russell-Sherlock Holmes stories (from The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, named one of the 20th century’s best crime novels by the IMBA, to 2018’s Island of the Mad).  She has won an alphabet of prizes from Agatha to Wolfe, been chosen as guest of honor at several crime conventions, and is probably the only writer to have both an Edgar and an honorary doctorate in theology. She was inducted into the Baker Street Irregulars in 2010, as “The Red Circle.”

 

What Can You Expect from Laurie R. King at the Summer Writers Retreat?

Session 5 at our Summer Writers Retreat, (last and definitely not least!) will be presented by Laurie R. King at 3:15pm

Sustaining a Series with Laurie R. King

Every writer who starts a series hopes it will be a success—but what happens when it is? How do I keep the sixth—or sixteenth—book in a series as fresh and unpredictable as the first? Is it a matter of changing the setting? Do I (gasp) kill off my supporting actors? Or do I keep bringing in new ones, juggling them in with the characters my readers have come to know and love? And what do I do about my less popular series, or the standalones I long to write? How can I as a writer have it all?

Laurie R. King is the New York Times bestselling author of 27 novels and other works, including the Mary Russell-Sherlock Holmes stories (from The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, named one of the 20th century’s best crime novels by the IMBA, to 2018’s Island of the Mad).  She has won an alphabet of prizes from Agatha to Wolfe, been chosen as guest of honor at several crime conventions, and is probably the only writer to have both an Edgar and an honorary doctorate in theology. She was inducted into the Baker Street Irregulars in 2010, as “The Red Circle.”

What Can You Expect from Linda L. Richards at the Summer Writers Retreat?

Session 4 will be presented by Linda L. Richards at 2:00pm

Secrets of the Publishing World with Linda L. Richards

This 60-minute event gives you a fast and furious glimpse behind the scenes of publishing. Richards will talk about finding and attracting an agent, pitching your book at various levels, how to decide when it’s time to self-publish and other topics relevant for those anxious to find the edge in this competitive world.

 

Linda L. Richards is the award-winning author of 15 books, a highly sought after professional editor, and the former Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of both Self-Counsel Press and January Magazine. She has also taught writing and publishing at the college level.